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Develop self-awareness and infuse your creative practice with spirituality through the art of the mandala!

“Mandala” is a Sanskrit word that literally translates to “container of essence” (manda—“essence”—and la—“container”). In ancient Hindu and Buddhist religious traditions, mandalas were vessels for meditation and would be burned after being created to emphasize detachment. (Don’t worry, we’re not going to burn our artwork, although you’re welcome to if you’d like to really let go!) They’ve been reintroduced to the modern world thanks to Carl Jung, who claimed mandalas were a map of one’s interior world. Art therapists today use mandalas to aide in reducing anxiety and depression, since the repetition of lines and shapes can be soothing and help take your mind off your worries.

In this class, you’ll learn varied approaches to making mandalas and will experiment until you find a style and process that works for you. You’ll come away with an appreciation for the rich spiritual tradition of mandala-making and have learned more about yourself through the art of the mandala!

 

Potter – Saturday, June 13th, 1pm – 3:30pm (TACOL Spring 2020)

 

This class is conducted online! A computer with audio, video, and internet functionality is required. Student gives permission for The ArtsCenter and for instructor to use their image and comments in class recordings for promotional non-commercial purposes. Refunds and exchanges are not offered for online classes.

 

All ArtSchool registrations have a $3 processing fee added upon check-out.


ArtsCenter members receive 15% off of the cost of this course!

 

Materials List for Mandala Workshop

Below is my recommended arsenal of materials for making mandalas. However, you absolutely do NOT have to buy all these items online. I’m a big fan of using what you have to make art–after all, resourcefulness is just creativity in action! For each art supply below, I’ve listed alternate DIY supplies you can utilize for this class.

 

  • Compass/Protractor
    • If you can’t find your trusty protractor from high school geometry, finding a variety of circular-shaped items at home will work just fine! Mixing bowls, plant pots, glasses, spice jar lids, and circular earrings are a few of my favorite items to trace!
  • Pencil and Eraser
    • Your kid’s no. 2 pencils from elementary school will work just fine!
  • Ruler
    • Any straight, hard-edged item, like a thick piece of paper, will do.
  • Templates/Stencils (for tracing shapes)
    • This circle templateis good, but if you find one with other shapes bring that!
  • Mixed Media Sketchbook (11×14)
    • If you don’t have access to a sketchbook, mixed media, or watercolor paper, then standard computer paper will work fine. You just won’t be able to load it up with too much paint!)
  • Markers
    • I like these 2 artist brands best: Copic Sketch Markers and Chartpak Art Markers, which are blendable. But if all you have are Crayola markers that’s fine too! Just aim for a mix of fine point markers and thick markers.
  • Colored Pencils
  • Watercolor Paint
  • Watercolor Brushes (small, round-tip for detail work)
  • Micron Pens
    • I recommend #001, #05, #08, and a Brush-tip. Fine point Sharpies and Regular Sharpies also work.
  • 1-2 sheets of 22×30 140lb cold-press watercolor paperforfinal project if you’d like to go BIG with your mandalas!
  • Any other art supplies you’d like to bring! 
    • Paint pens, acrylic inks, stamps, etc. The sky’s the limit!